A Visit to the Magbukun Tribe

Today we stretched our legs a little while and took a stroll to visit an Indigenous People’s community (IP) to learn more about their lives. We worked with our trainers/translators to hear how climate change was affecting them… crop seasons are shifting, hunting is more important, alternative livelihoods are being sought. And then we did some cross-cultural exchanges; we learned how to survive in the wild with just a machete and a piece of bamboo, we watched kids dance to the rhythm of bamboo sticks, and then we sang and danced for them as well!

I wish I could say I learned more about the IP, that I had the language and words today to sit and ask them about their lives, to share a little about mine, but I did not. Before I started writing this post, I turned to my friend Google for some background information on the tribe and discovered that there were only FOUR results: 3 scientific journal papers, 1 blog post from last year. So what I have to offer about the Magbukun Tribe, is that they were kind, curious, and welcoming, and the best way to show you that, I believe, is with photos:

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First we had to cross a hanging bridge… the motorcycle was not part of our group (and is bawal, forbidden, as a Peace Corps Trainee/Volunteer)!

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I cross the bridge in candy-colored tsinelas (slippers)

 

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The views were breathtaking, even on a stormy day

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Navigating through the mud

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Banana and papaya trees on every side

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The Tribe’s Multi-Purpose Hall. I love how the names of the Elders and Members is listed for all to see. And the cool kids, very cool kids.

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The only tool you need to survive in the jungle, a machete!

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Attempting to make a fire using dry bamboo…

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Success!

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Now we’re learning how to make a rice cooker, cups, plates, and a fork/all-purpose tool from bamboo: mind = blown!

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The kids treated us to a dance routine!

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Enter a caption

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Some of the little kids were really curious about my camera, so I would take photos and then let check themselves out. Some smiled, some seem slightly mortified.

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The girl in the middle, wearing stripes, loved the camera. She brought her younger sibling over to pose with her.

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Playing in the puddles

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And finally, we end things with a wacky group photo!

Hope you enjoyed,

S

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2 responses to “A Visit to the Magbukun Tribe

  1. great post keep them coming

    From: The Wondering Wandering Woman To: edyfriedman@yahoo.com Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 5:58 PM Subject: [New post] A Visit to the Magbukan Tribe #yiv4098644575 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv4098644575 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv4098644575 a.yiv4098644575primaryactionlink:link, #yiv4098644575 a.yiv4098644575primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv4098644575 a.yiv4098644575primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv4098644575 a.yiv4098644575primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv4098644575 WordPress.com | stavfree posted: “Today we stretched our legs a little while and took a stroll to visit an Indigenous People’s community (IP) to learn more about their lives. We worked with our trainers/translators to hear how climate change was affecting them… crop seasons are shifting” | |

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